Disney+ (Streaming Service)

GadgetGuru

Premium Member
Dec 2, 2011
2,192
Seattle, WA
It’s frustrating that we’re less than a week from launch and there’s no sign of the app anywhere. I’d love to be able to download and create a Disney+ account now, because if everyone has to wait until next Tuesday to do it, then I see servers going down quickly.
Disney really wants to minimize the amount of people who sign up for their accounts in the app. Apple takes a 30% (ish) percent cut of the account fees when you sign up inside the app. I'm assuming Disney won't allow you to sign up inside the app to avoid paying the fee.

If so, releasing the app now would be pointless because the app could literally do nothing.
 

Livetaswim06

Newcomer
Jul 4, 2019
46
I think releasing the app would be a good idea. People could learn how to navigate around, set up favorites, watch trailers for whatever they choose to. Launching app on date of release seems challenging.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nick

Scott W.

Premium Member
Feb 26, 2014
11,303
Glasgow
Disney really wants to minimize the amount of people who sign up for their accounts in the app. Apple takes a 30% (ish) percent cut of the account fees when you sign up inside the app. I'm assuming Disney won't allow you to sign up inside the app to avoid paying the fee.

If so, releasing the app now would be pointless because the app could literally do nothing.
I’m assuming that’s only for people signing up with their Apple account. I can’t imagine that Netflix and other companies are handing over that fee.

Edit: Had a quick look at the Netflix app and you need to sign up using a browser.

It’s something that Disney could still do as downloading the App isn’t going to be an issue on launch day.
 

GadgetGuru

Premium Member
Dec 2, 2011
2,192
Seattle, WA
I’m assuming that’s only for people signing up with their Apple account. I can’t imagine that Netflix and other companies are handing over that fee.

Edit: Had a quick look at the Netflix app and you need to sign up using a browser.

It’s something that Disney could still do as downloading the App isn’t going to be an issue on launch day.
If you handle billing through Apple, Apple takes 30%*. The only way that Apple allows you to let users sign up for subscriptions in the app is if you do billing through Apple.

* 30% for the first year a user is subscribed and then 15% for any month afterwards. I would think most app subscriptions would be for < 1 year, but video apps are probably an exception.
 

Scott W.

Premium Member
Feb 26, 2014
11,303
Glasgow
You get the feeling that, at least, The Mandalorian will be highly pirated.
It absolutely will be. For many people it will be a necessity to watch because it's not available in their area and waiting 5 months while being able to avoid spoilers is going to be virtually impossible.
 

Paulio

Veteran Member
Apr 28, 2016
1,020
Northern California
Really don’t see an issue. Saying a number of movies is a bit much for just three movies and one being a post credit.
I mean, they're not going to put all examples of certain scenes on its movies in this article, just a selection of them being examples being censored to appease to the little kids, even though they have much more "mature" content in other family-friendly films.
 

Imperius

Veteran Member
Feb 28, 2015
3,375
I mean, they're not going to put all examples of certain scenes on its movies in this article, just a selection of them being examples being censored to appease to the little kids, even though they have much more "mature" content in other family-friendly films.
Having mature content is fine. Removing the things they are doing isn’t removing mature content. Iffy racist scenes don’t really need to stay any more.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Legacy

Paulio

Veteran Member
Apr 28, 2016
1,020
Northern California
Having mature content is fine. Removing the things they are doing isn’t removing mature content. Iffy racist scenes don’t really need to stay any more.
Including removing a somewhat absurd reason for a post-Toy Story II scene where Pete offering twin Barbies parts in the next movie saying it was sexually suggestive, despite not really noticing the difference as a kid, and can pass off as somewhat a normal talk.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Andysol

Imperius

Veteran Member
Feb 28, 2015
3,375
Including removing a somewhat absurd reason for a post-Toy Story II scene where Pete offering twin Barbies parts in the next movie saying it was sexually suggestive, despite not really noticing the difference as a kid, and can pass off as somewhat a normal talk.
Not really. With the Harvey Weinstein issues lately it’s really done in bad taste. That’s not so much a mature theme, but just a tasteless joke in a kids movie.
 

Paulio

Veteran Member
Apr 28, 2016
1,020
Northern California
Not really. With the Harvey Weinstein issues lately it’s really done in bad taste. That’s not so much a mature theme, but just a tasteless joke in a kids movie.
But dude, like 20 years later? That's the dumbest excuse I've ever heard. I've seen this scene a thousand times as a kid and nowhere it mentions anything degrading and nowhere the thought of Weinstein/or idea of a sexually aggressive Hollywood executive ever come up (nor many people will believe in this matter) nor the scene itself is sexually suggestive. The scene actually satirizes couch-casting culture and Petey (who is a bad guy in the movie) got caught red-handed, and even so, nothing suggests anything sexually aggressive or degrading toward women in this movie, it's not like you see a Simpsons type joke in the movie.

Sorry, but I'm not ok with Disney censoring scenes that actually have no proper connections to real-life events just because of a small percentage of other people who are overly-sensitive to this scene. Otherwise, remove the Splash Mountain ride at Disney parks because it's based on the 1946 film "Song of the South", which Disney itself won't allow a home video release due to racist content towards black people. It just sets a bad precedent just because people think certain scenes can be offensive even if not actually intended at all.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Andysol

Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
18,297
Orlando
But dude, like 20 years later? That's the dumbest excuse I've ever heard. I've seen this scene a thousand times as a kid and nowhere it mentions anything degrading and nowhere the thought of Weinstein/or idea of a sexually aggressive Hollywood executive ever come up (nor many people will believe in this matter) nor the scene itself is sexually suggestive. The scene actually satirizes couch-casting culture and Petey (who is a bad guy in the movie) got caught red-handed, and even so, nothing suggests anything sexually aggressive or degrading toward women in this movie, it's not like you see a Simpsons type joke in the movie.

Sorry, but I'm not ok with Disney censoring scenes that actually have no proper connections to real-life events just because of a small percentage of other people who are overly-sensitive to this scene. Otherwise, remove the Splash Mountain ride at Disney parks because it's based on the 1946 film "Song of the South", which Disney itself won't allow a home video release due to racist content towards black people. It just sets a bad precedent just because people think certain scenes can be offensive even if not actually intended at all.
That was a different time. With the Weinstein stuff out there now, most adults first thought will be of a sexual situation and as for kids... the scene isn’t necessary. Kids won’t miss it. If all you’re doing with a scene is offending people in poor taste, then it’s not worth it.
 

belloq87

Veteran Member
Dec 7, 2009
3,460
Universal Exports
I don't know that going in and re-editing older works (often without the input/participation/consent of the original creators) to conform to today's standards (whatever those may be) is a particularly ethical or worthwhile endeavor.

Almost any older movie could contain something that might offend someone. Scrubbing them from the record could be a dangerous path to go down.

Warner Bros. handled this sort of stuff the exact right way with their presentations of the various controversial Looney Tunes shorts by supplying historical context, modern analysis, and then the unedited piece of work.
 

Paulio

Veteran Member
Apr 28, 2016
1,020
Northern California
That was a different time. With the Weinstein stuff out there now, most adults first thought will be of a sexual situation and as for kids... the scene isn’t necessary. Kids won’t miss it. If all you’re doing with a scene is offending people in poor taste, then it’s not worth it.
I guarantee that a bunch of adults and kids wouldn't even really tell the difference in this scene, especially when it doesn't endorse, but sanitizes the couch-casting culture in an obscure and non-explicit way. That's like removing the original WTC scene in older movies/TV shows just because of 9/11. Even if you're right, it's a really dangerous path to go down from, and it just makes people more curious about what the original edit is really all about.
 

Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
18,297
Orlando
I guarantee that a bunch of adults and kids wouldn't even really tell the difference in this scene, especially when it doesn't endorse, but sanitizes the couch-casting culture in an obscure and non-explicit way. That's like removing the original WTC scene in older movies/TV shows just because of 9/11. Even if you're right, it's a really dangerous path to go down from, and it just makes people more curious about what the original edit is really all about.
Sanitizing it is exactly why they pulled the scene. They don’t want to it to seem like they are making light of a dark subject.