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Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser

MrRoamer

Premium Member
May 20, 2013
2,180
Local
I have no idea how you convince someone to spend this much money to a resort that consists of a single building with a brief field trip and a fully booked itinerary. That sounds like a convention or something not a vacation.

Putting this in Disney World and saying its gonna cost this much oh and btw no Disney World for you! If this was a boutique experience in select cities, it makes sense. In my opinion putting it here makes it less likely someone will actually consider it.
 

UniversalRBLX

Veteran Member
Nov 3, 2015
3,421
Cabana Bae
I'm sure if it's popular enough we'd end up seeing a Marvel version of this somewhere. Probably at one of their Asian Resorts since Star Wars isn't as popular over there.
We could see other locations throughout the country (like New York) and in places that don't have a Disney resort. However, I doubt there's that many people to support multiple locations.
 

Tristan

Contributing Member
Jan 22, 2020
736
*DisneyQuest flashbacks*
My favorite part about DisneyQuest is that it was the worst possible place to be in case of a fire. This place will probably be the same. No real windows, and only one (presumed) exit.
 

UniversalRBLX

Veteran Member
Nov 3, 2015
3,421
Cabana Bae
*DisneyQuest flashbacks*
Pretty much. It's odd how Disney constantly changes their game plan every few years or so. It seems like every few years they decide to get back into gaming before they cancel again.

I can see this working in places like Australia and London, but at a lower price point since you won't have a land attached to it.
 

HandsomePete

Contributing Member
Jul 8, 2019
920
Outside of the existential crisis this place creates for theme park fans, one of the benefits of the cruise model is they can run this as demand fits. So they can run it continuously OR once a month and still be profitable.
Based on how much this thing cost to build, the words “once a month” and “profitable” don’t belong in the same paragraph.

Operating revenue exceeding operating cost =/= profitable.
 

Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
8,977
I don’t think they’re going to run it “180” times a year. Even based on a two-night stay, that’s technically 3 days. They’ll also likely need one day every couple of weeks to do full maintenance on the effects.

I expect there to be a weekend “cruise” that departs Friday and returns Sunday. And a “mid-week” cruise that runs Tuesday to Thursday. That leaves Monday as a day off (or rehearsal day) for performers and gives a full day of maintenance for everything. If that’s what they do, then it’s only 110 “voyages” a year.
 

SeventyOne

V.I.P.
Jul 1, 2010
3,233
Orlando
I don’t think they’re going to run it “180” times a year. Even based on a two-night stay, that’s technically 3 days. They’ll also likely need one day every couple of weeks to do full maintenance on the effects.

I expect there to be a weekend “cruise” that departs Friday and returns Sunday. And a “mid-week” cruise that runs Tuesday to Thursday. That leaves Monday as a day off (or rehearsal day) for performers and gives a full day of maintenance for everything. If that’s what they do, then it’s only 110 “voyages” a year.
Unless it's meant to continue the illusion like the muster drill*, then why hustle guests out at 8 a.m.? That's not going to be popular--it's not popular on real ships--and would seem unnecessary unless you plan on turning the hotel around by noon.

* (Even the muster drill I assume has some storytelling aspect, and is likely an excuse to get everyone in the same room while Capt Exposition spiels.)
 
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Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
8,977
Unless it's meant to continue the illusion like the muster drill*, then why hustle guests out at 8 a.m.? That's not going to be popular--it's not popular on real ships--and would seem unnecessary unless you plan on turning the hotel around by noon.

* (Even the muster drill I assume has some storytelling aspect, and is likely an excuse to get everyone in the same room while Capt Exposition spiels.)
It’s definitely possible. Get everyone out by 11am. Turn over the rooms and have check-in be at 4pm. You’re still only squeezing 1 more voyage a week in there, so it could be 165.

The challenge with that schedule is that, because of the premium nature of the experience, 5 hours is unlikely to be enough time fix damages that may occur in rooms. And, considering the limited occupancy and kid-focused nature of the experience, it’s not really viable to move a family to a different cabin if, say, decor has been torn from the walls. Allowing 24 hours of turn-over maximizes that sort of time.

I liken it to Victoria & Albert’s. The expectation is that one party will be at a table for the night. They don’t attempt to turn it over in three minutes to try and cram a second party into the evening. Rushing it increases the likelihood that something will get missed. The premium price pays for the that extra time.
 
Aug 1, 2018
1,344
Los Angeles
It’s definitely possible. Get everyone out by 11am. Turn over the rooms and have check-in be at 4pm. You’re still only squeezing 1 more voyage a week in there, so it could be 165.

The challenge with that schedule is that, because of the premium nature of the experience, 5 hours is unlikely to be enough time fix damages that may occur in rooms. And, considering the limited occupancy and kid-focused nature of the experience, it’s not really viable to move a family to a different cabin if, say, decor has been torn from the walls. Allowing 24 hours of turn-over maximizes that sort of time.

I liken it to Victoria & Albert’s. The expectation is that one party will be at a table for the night. They don’t attempt to turn it over in three minutes to try and cram a second party into the evening. Rushing it increases the likelihood that something will get missed. The premium price pays for the that extra time.
Cruises do it all the time. We are talking about 20% capacity of what cruises do. The turn over is not going to be a big deal. Certainly going to take more staff to get it done but it should be fine.
 

Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
8,977
Cruises do it all the time. We are talking about 20% capacity of what cruises do. The turn over is not going to be a big deal. Certainly going to take more staff to get it done but it should be fine.
Except it’s not actually a cruise. For example, the “Captain” is a union performer who won’t be able to perform from 8 am muster through an 8 pm dinner. Cruise ships also don’t have lobbies that double as stunt shows.

EDIT - You have to think about how tightly choreographed this experience is. It’s far more than just clean up. If the “Bridge” goes down, it’s not like the guests can just wait by the pool or the arcade. It’s a 48 hour “show.” That requires constant, regular maintenance that Disney won’t really be able to do while guests are there. Allowing 24 hours between voyages allows cleaning, one, but—more importantly—allows them to ensure the lightsabers, the bridge, the “elevator,” et al. works before guests get to them.
 
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HandsomePete

Contributing Member
Jul 8, 2019
920
The challenge with that schedule is that, because of the premium nature of the experience, 5 hours is unlikely to be enough time fix damages that may occur in rooms. And, considering the limited occupancy and kid-focused nature of the experience, it’s not really viable to move a family to a different cabin if, say, decor has been torn from the walls. Allowing 24 hours of turn-over maximizes that sort of time.
Except if it runs at 90% occupancy - which would put it in the top 1% of all hotels in Orlando and probably the top 0.1% in the world - that means there are 10 rooms sitting empty for each “voyage.” That’s how hotels manage the sort of thing you’re describing - a specific room gets taken out of inventory and the 90 reservations get slotted into the other 99 available rooms.

Based on the nature of the hotel, they fundamentally can’t be aggressive with yield management and won’t get close to 100% occupancy even if the demand is there to do it. Think of WDW as a whole - you can afford to overbook All Star because people just get walked to a better hotel, while you have to play it safe with Grand Floridian because walking people from there is not tenable.
 

Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
8,977
I suspect it will run at over 90% occupancy for the first year or two.

And again, it’s not just about the rooms. It’s about the highly stringent structure of the entire thing.
 
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Grabnar

V.I.P.
Aug 5, 2018
1,360
If third shift can’t keep the lightsaber room functioning, then they should just pull the plug on it now.
Legacy's right in that this is basically an immersive theater experience with a bed and a mess hall. The amount of work that goes into a full theater production is insane, I can't even imagine how in depth this one is once you factor in the tech that goes into it.

I'd still like to do this someday, but I am definitely not in the demographic that can afford to drop $5-6k on 2 nights.
 

WAJAS

Veteran Member
Aug 15, 2014
3,555
--Classified--
I really want to do this, but I simply can't make it work at the current price.

I'd really appreciate a shortened 1-night version for 600 USD or less per guest per night.

EDIT: I thought about it. I still wouldn't do it for that cost.
 
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