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Effects of Coronavirus (COVID-19) On Entertainment & Tourism Industry

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awhen

Member
Sep 19, 2013
695
VistaVision was a short-lived process where 35mm film was run sideways producing an image of 1.85:1, or 1.77:1 Currently proceesses are either Panavision (2.40:1), Matted (just use a portion of the frame - 1.85:1) or Super 35 (Use only half a 35mm negative but print it widescreen to 2.40:1).
If I may... vista vision had a long life shooting VFX for optical compositing. It’s 8 perfs sideways.

35mm film is either Academy or Super35. Both are 1.33:1 (4-perf), but super uses the full area of the negative vs Academy which reserves the side for a printed optical soundtrack. 1.85 is matted, 2.35 uses anamorphic lenses.

You can also do 3-perf 35mm to save some stock if your shooting 1:85 or 2-perf (also called Techniscope) if you’re shooting 2.35.
Neither of these is very common.
 

OLSinFLA

Veteran Member
May 26, 2012
1,628
If I may... vista vision had a long life shooting VFX for optical compositing. It’s 8 perfs sideways.

35mm film is either Academy or Super35. Both are 1.33:1 (4-perf), but super uses the full area of the negative vs Academy which reserves the side for a printed optical soundtrack. 1.85 is matted, 2.35 uses anamorphic lenses.

You can also do 3-perf 35mm to save some stock if your shooting 1:85 or 2-perf (also called Techniscope) if you’re shooting 2.35.
Neither of these is very common.
Didn't want to get too deep into VV and its variants but yes, ILM resurrected VV for effects. 70mm was also used for effects back in the day to reduce graineness when added into 35mm (Close Encounters). Suoer 35 can use the full negative but only the inented ratio is whats shot for. Opening it up can lead to microphone booms in the frame or the endless bicyle chain in Pee Wee's Great Adventure :D. A lot of S35 directors have in in their contracts they ratio can only be altered under their supervision. Others like Ron Howard prefer to "hard matte" (blocking the unuse portions) to prevent studios from screwing around with it :D
'
 

awhen

Member
Sep 19, 2013
695
Didn't want to get too deep into VV and its variants but yes, ILM resurrected VV for effects. 70mm was also used for effects back in the day to reduce graineness when added into 35mm (Close Encounters). Suoer 35 can use the full negative but only the inented ratio is whats shot for. Opening it up can lead to microphone booms in the frame or the endless bicyle chain in Pee Wee's Great Adventure :D. A lot of S35 directors have in in their contracts they ratio can only be altered under their supervision. Others like Ron Howard prefer to "hard matte" (blocking the unuse portions) to prevent studios from screwing around with it :D
'
The point was that Super35 in and of itself doesn’t imply the presentation aspect ratio, it just means your camera aperture covers the entire frame (it also has a different optical center than Academy). But I’m being picky I suppose.

Anyway everything is scanned now, so nobody cares about the limitations of optical processes. :)
 
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Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
21,886
Orlando
Until Theaters 1)Improve the experience and 2)Don't feel like a complete ripoff, they will continue to decline.

Even the "highest box office numbers ever" we've been getting recently come from fewer and fewer tickets sold.
Unless you have an absolutely spectacular sound system (which only means you’re privileged and can afford it), then the movie theater experience is already the best way to watch a movie.

Chris Rock had this to say on the subject recently:

“I don’t think movies are dead. I think Noah is absolutely right that studios want ten hours of something. But never underestimate that movies are part of a mating ritual. That’s just what humans do. We go to movies. And it’s still the most affordable part of the mating ritual that there is. It’s cheaper than going to any sports game, it’s cheaper than theater. People need to get out of the house and that hasn’t been replaced. So I don’t think movies are going anywhere.”

 

Jerroddragon

V.I.P.
Jun 27, 2017
1,157
More people jobless now as today I'm seeing cases at an all time low and even less deaths then ever before. Really hope the theme parks can work something out before the end of the year.
 
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Mad Dog

Premium Member
Jan 30, 2013
19,426
Pittsburgh area
The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the US is indicating they will open up travel with the UK within the next couple of months. Lengthy quarantines will be avoided by
using new testing to test guests before boarding and upon arrival at their destination.
 
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Brian G.

Editor-in-Chief
Staff member
Administrator
Jan 21, 2008
20,908
Orlando, FL
The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the US is indicating they will open up travel with the UK within the next couple of months. Lengthy quarantines will be avoided by
using new testing to test guests before boarding and upon arrival at their destination.
I need you to do me a big favor and start linking the stories. It gives our readers the source so they can read further, but also - these sites make money off our views and some need it now more than ever.
 
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OhHaiInternet95

Veteran Member
Aug 18, 2017
3,351
Wait? Are we talking about the pandemic? Or the OG #NeverAgain? Cause that seems relevant too.
The big problem is pandemics choose us, we don't choose the pandemic. It comes and goes on it's on terms.
I'm saying we have to keep this a once in a century event...they say for about $30B/year (combined globally!) we could. That's chump change.

Disasters are often a series of very preventable mistakes, and COVID-19 is no exception.
 

Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
7,076
I'm saying we have to keep this a once in a century event...they say for about $30B/year (combined globally!) we could. That's chump change.

Disasters are often a series of very preventable mistakes, and COVID-19 is no exception.
There’s a saying in the military that applies here: “The enemy gets a vote.” Virus mutations are inevitable. The frequency and severity of those mutations is entirely up to chance. As such, actual pandemics occur about every 20-30 years. That’s unlikely to change. Because nature gets a vote.

The only thing that can actually change in the face of a pandemic (or earthquake, hurricane, tornado, tsunami, wildfire, etc.) is the reaction and response to the unique variables of that particular event. This is just an example of a poor response.
 

OhHaiInternet95

Veteran Member
Aug 18, 2017
3,351
There’s a saying in the military that applies here: “The enemy gets a vote.” Virus mutations are inevitable. The frequency and severity of those mutations is entirely up to chance. As such, actual pandemics occur about every 20-30 years. That’s unlikely to change. Because nature gets a vote.

The only thing that can actually change in the face of a pandemic (or earthquake, hurricane, tornado, tsunami, wildfire, etc.) is the reaction and response to the unique variables of that particular event. This is just an example of a poor response.
Maybe, but between Spanish Flu and COVID there was not a pandemic that shut down the world. I guess I should've added the phrase "of this magnitude." The thing is, for all we know we might actually be lucky that this was the virus that "made it." I think of three fictional pandemics: MEV-1 (Contagion) (26 mil dead over six months), CAPS (65 mil dead over 18 months), and Clade-X (150 million dead over 20 months). Maybe this pandemic gets us to get our act together and prevent a pathogen as deadly as any of those three from becoming a problem...

Perhaps I'm being foolishly optimistic that we actually learn a thing or two from this mess, but what choice do I have...
 
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Mad Dog

Premium Member
Jan 30, 2013
19,426
Pittsburgh area
Maybe, but between Spanish Flu and COVID there was not a pandemic that shut down the world. I guess I should've added the phrase "of this magnitude." The thing is, for all we know we might actually be lucky that this was the virus that "made it." I think of three fictional pandemics: MEV-1 (Contagion) (26 mil dead over six months), CAPS (65 mil dead over 18 months), and Clade-X (150 million dead over 20 months). Maybe this pandemic gets us to get our act together and prevent a pathogen as deadly as any of those three from becoming a problem...

Perhaps I'm being foolishly optimistic that we actually learn a thing or two from this mess, but what choice do I have...
There were actually a couple of pandemics in between, where the world death toll after 6 months was in the vicinity of this one. But fortunately, they didn't hit the US very hard. We've been lucky here. Most of the
third world has had epic disease disasters more frequently than most realize.
 

Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
7,076
Maybe, but between Spanish Flu and COVID there was not a pandemic that shut down the world. I guess I should've added the phrase "of this magnitude." The thing is, for all we know we might actually be lucky that this was the virus that "made it." I think of three fictional pandemics: MEV-1 (Contagion) (26 mil dead over six months), CAPS (65 mil dead over 18 months), and Clade-X (150 million dead over 20 months). Maybe this pandemic gets us to get our act together and prevent a pathogen as deadly as any of those three from becoming a problem...

Perhaps I'm being foolishly optimistic that we actually learn a thing or two from this mess, but what choice do I have...
Lessons mean nothing if the response ignores them. The response is what matters.

The HIV/AIDS pandemic lasted over 20 years and is still classified as a “global epidemic” by the WHO. We (the US) responded poorly to that—in multiple facets. The response to COVID shares some parallels in the response failures.

Point is, you can’t “prevent” pandemics. They happen. You can only respond and attempt to control it while hoping the response you choose is the correct one (because nature gets its vote).

And looking at fictional pandemics don’t help. They’re intentionally catastrophic for drama. If something arises that mimics the infection rates of those, we’re unlikely to have time to respond correctly regardless. Borders would shut immediately and the global economy would freeze entirely.
 

Disneyhead

Legendary Member
Jul 24, 2008
11,108
Orlando, FL
Lessons mean nothing if the response ignores them. The response is what matters.

The HIV/AIDS pandemic lasted over 20 years and is still classified as a “global epidemic” by the WHO. We (the US) responded poorly to that—in multiple facets. The response to COVID shares some parallels in the response failures.

Point is, you can’t “prevent” pandemics. They happen. You can only respond and attempt to control it while hoping the response you choose is the correct one (because nature gets its vote).

And looking at fictional pandemics don’t help. They’re intentionally catastrophic for drama. If something arises that mimics the infection rates of those, we’re unlikely to have time to respond correctly regardless. Borders would shut immediately and the global economy would freeze entirely.
"Swiftly contained viral outbreaks make terrible disaster movies"- Frank Kincaid, 1990.
 
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