Race Through NY Starring Jimmy Fallon

Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
19,805
Orlando
No, but that building was built to withstand a 3.5 Earthquake. I doubt the old Twister building was...
Before softs when they were just testing Fallon, you could actually see the building shaking due to the early intensity of the ride profile, which has since been turned down.
 
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WAJAS98

Veteran Member
Aug 15, 2014
3,276
--Classified--
Before softs when they were just testing Fallon, you could actually see the building shaking due to the early intensity of the ride profile, which has since been turned down.
I am a witness to the said accusation. lol

I did see the building shaking by the stage door on the concert stage side of the building. There was something hanging from the ceiling that was noticeably shaking and the far end door was visibly shaking.
 
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Alicia

Premium Member
Jul 17, 2014
9,482
Orlando
I am a witness to the said accusation. lol

I did see the building shaking by the stage door on the concert stage side of the building. There was something hanging from the ceiling that was noticeably shaking and the far end door was visibly shaking.
If it was brief it might've been the roller coaster passing through. I notice all the windows and doors wobble when the coaster passes through the building. But that only lasts a couple seconds and then stops.
 
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Mad Dog

Premium Member
Jan 30, 2013
18,132
Pittsburgh area
If it was brief it might've been the roller coaster passing through. I notice all the windows and doors wobble when the coaster passes through the building. But that only lasts a couple seconds and then stops.
That would be good news if that turns out to be the case. But since they turned down the motion during testing, I would be fearful the problem is the motion base. As I've said before, the similar system at BGW when it was Corkscrew Hill, had such intense motion it actually beat you up pretty good. Great for thrill seekers but not so good for anyone with even a trace of motion sickness. Back then (10 years ago) I was still able to ride most any coaster, but Corkscrew Hill made me nauseous for hours afterwards.......So maybe it's better if they keep Race Through NY fairly calm.
 

Joe

aka TestTrack321
Staff member
Moderator
Feb 15, 2012
11,931
Pittsburgh, PA
Before softs when they were just testing Fallon, you could actually see the building shaking due to the early intensity of the ride profile, which has since been turned down.
Man this ride is even more of a mess than I could have imagined.
 

Blaw923

Member
Feb 10, 2016
588
I kinda wish that they would now convert Minions in to an amazing Dark Ride, it's such an incredible IP and would make a visually impressive dark ride, with little Minion AA's... I mean, Fallon kinda fills the niche Minions has in terms of ride tech, so now lets try something new.
Couldn't agree more! Minions is a create "its a small world' type disney counter. Universal fails this child dark ride slot.
 

Ryan

Staff member
Moderator
May 23, 2013
4,434
I still don't truly consider Soarin' an E-ticket considering the lack of theming in the queue and in the showroom - you literally just walk into a room with a giant IMAX screen in front of you and strap in.

As far as demand go it may be considered one (although with FEA open and the third theater, it usually sits at 45 min waits now), but Demand isn't the only thing that determines an E-Ticket or else FEA is a mega-E and we all know that isn't true.
I would always say with E-Tickets, appeal and demand overtakes show quality in some cases. Soarin is a super headliner, and it's popularity creates the designation. Even Walt Disney knew that, as many of the original E-Tickets were popular transportation options.

59+Replica+E.JPG (image)

Of course, the signifier is more symbolic nowadays but I think it still counts. When Soarin debuted in DCA, it was installed as a D-ticket attraction. I think the company was taken aback with how popular it was, and the Epcot installation was seeing more towards the E-ticket side. Fallon truly is just a filler attraction, with VB being the true 2017 draw, which allows the blow of its inconsistency quality to be felt easier.
 
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JoeCamel

Premium Member
May 20, 2015
5,028
Ever Lurking
Okay, so today I went through my construction updates to create a recap video (like I did with Kongstruction not too long ago.) My pictures go back to December 2015.

Strange to see Twister again. The facade really has come a long way.

Keep it up @AliciaStella, these will live on with @Marni1971 (Martin's) ultimate tribute work. Thanks for doing this.
 
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Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
19,805
Orlando
I would always say with E-Tickets, appeal and demand overtakes show quality in some cases. Soarin is a super headliner, and it's popularity creates the designation. Even Walt Disney knew that, as many of the original E-Tickets were popular transportation options.

59+Replica+E.JPG (image)

Of course, the signifier is more symbolic nowadays but I think it still counts. When Soarin debuted in DCA, it was installed as a D-ticket attraction. I think the company was taken aback with how popular it was, and the Epcot installation was seeing more towards the E-ticket side. Fallon truly is just a filler attraction, with VB being the true 2017 draw, which allows the blow of its inconsistency quality to be felt easier.
I think maybe if we are leaning more towards appeal and demand when qualifying if it's a D or E, then you're right, it's an E at Epcot.... but that's only because there are so few appealing attractions at the park. If rides currently on the table get built, Soarin' automatically goes down to a D even in the sense you are talking about.

But that's enough about Soarin' for now. Back to Fallon.
 
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TheGentTrent

Member
Apr 4, 2013
880
Tampa
Finally got to give this a chance myself. Despite not revealing any story details, I'm just going to post my thoughts as a spoiler for those who want to go in with fresh eyes.

Let me just start out by saying that I am generally impressed by anything Disney or Universal puts out, so your mileage will likely vary. Therefore, I'm not one to participate in the SCREENZ debate and look at each ride's merits on its own. Having said that, I do understand the space limitations this building had. Since there isn't really much else Universal could do with such a small site, a simulator here seems like the only proper fit. You'd have a really cheesy and really short ride otherwise. With regards to the facade, it's a major improvement over Twister and looks cool at night, but I do mourn the fact that Universal continues to leave parts of the showbuilding exposed. Why they continue to settle for doubles instead of aiming for home-runs in this field I'll never understand.

I didn't know the wait time feature was active (it might have been the first day of operation) on the UO app, so I had to get a return time from the kiosk. I like that it gives you an option in choosing your time, but didn't like that the only times available were two half-hour slots within an hour time frame. I'm sure there will be more options once the system is fully active though. Once my time was reached, I headed right in.

The first lobby was perhaps my favorite. The displays for the original NBC equipment and each of the hosts were cool and informative. My favorite part was that the TVs showing footage for each host were reflective of the era (Fallon on a big plasma while Allen was on a box model with a screen the size of my fist). That's the kind of attention to detail that can sell a skeptical rider. I would have traded my time on the upper level to keep watching the old TV sets.

The second lobby was also done well, but since only one ride theatre was being used, also way too crowded. I suspect once they start using two, it will feel a little more relaxed up there, but we won't know until it officially opens. I can't give a review about the games on the desks, but they did look fun. Since there were many kids present, I figured they should have a chance to play and it did keep them from running around, which is a bonus. The Ragtime Gals were funny, but I am most definitely not a big music guy and didn't pay much attention to them. Hashtag looked like he was having fun, as were the people he was posing with.

As for the ride, I thought it was really fun. I strongly agree with others here that the ride cards need more definitive color shades since I thought my yellow card was orange and would have missed my entry if I didn't see other card colors. The ride itself was perhaps the smoothest one out of all Universal has to offer and does a great job synching with the video for a 72 seater. Speaking of the video, the 3D is most convincing I've ever seen used on a ride. If I didn't know any better (and since this is a theme park, I always allow a little suspension of disbelief), I could have sworn that Steve Higgins was standing there in person at the beginning. Once all was said and done, I was a little disturbed that the whole experience took about an hour without telling people at the entrance what the duration would be, but again that will likely change once softs are done. I also would have preferred the vehicles to be individual cars like the one Fallon uses, but c'est la vie.

Overall, is it a tad disheartening to see another simulator right down the road from Minion Mayhem? Absolutely. But I had a smile on my face from load to unload, and if that doesn't make this a good ride, I don't know what will.
 

tielo

Veteran Member
Nov 9, 2013
1,982
The Netherlands
Finally got to give this a chance myself. Despite not revealing any story details, I'm just going to post my thoughts as a spoiler for those who want to go in with fresh eyes.

Let me just start out by saying that I am generally impressed by anything Disney or Universal puts out, so your mileage will likely vary. Therefore, I'm not one to participate in the SCREENZ debate and look at each ride's merits on its own. Having said that, I do understand the space limitations this building had. Since there isn't really much else Universal could do with such a small site, a simulator here seems like the only proper fit. You'd have a really cheesy and really short ride otherwise. With regards to the facade, it's a major improvement over Twister and looks cool at night, but I do mourn the fact that Universal continues to leave parts of the showbuilding exposed. Why they continue to settle for doubles instead of aiming for home-runs in this field I'll never understand.

I didn't know the wait time feature was active (it might have been the first day of operation) on the UO app, so I had to get a return time from the kiosk. I like that it gives you an option in choosing your time, but didn't like that the only times available were two half-hour slots within an hour time frame. I'm sure there will be more options once the system is fully active though. Once my time was reached, I headed right in.

The first lobby was perhaps my favorite. The displays for the original NBC equipment and each of the hosts were cool and informative. My favorite part was that the TVs showing footage for each host were reflective of the era (Fallon on a big plasma while Allen was on a box model with a screen the size of my fist). That's the kind of attention to detail that can sell a skeptical rider. I would have traded my time on the upper level to keep watching the old TV sets.

The second lobby was also done well, but since only one ride theatre was being used, also way too crowded. I suspect once they start using two, it will feel a little more relaxed up there, but we won't know until it officially opens. I can't give a review about the games on the desks, but they did look fun. Since there were many kids present, I figured they should have a chance to play and it did keep them from running around, which is a bonus. The Ragtime Gals were funny, but I am most definitely not a big music guy and didn't pay much attention to them. Hashtag looked like he was having fun, as were the people he was posing with.

As for the ride, I thought it was really fun. I strongly agree with others here that the ride cards need more definitive color shades since I thought my yellow card was orange and would have missed my entry if I didn't see other card colors. The ride itself was perhaps the smoothest one out of all Universal has to offer and does a great job synching with the video for a 72 seater. Speaking of the video, the 3D is most convincing I've ever seen used on a ride. If I didn't know any better (and since this is a theme park, I always allow a little suspension of disbelief), I could have sworn that Steve Higgins was standing there in person at the beginning. Once all was said and done, I was a little disturbed that the whole experience took about an hour without telling people at the entrance what the duration would be, but again that will likely change once softs are done. I also would have preferred the vehicles to be individual cars like the one Fallon uses, but c'est la vie.

Overall, is it a tad disheartening to see another simulator right down the road from Minion Mayhem? Absolutely. But I had a smile on my face from load to unload, and if that doesn't make this a good ride, I don't know what will.
You don't get the facade. Maybe Jason Surrell can explain it to you as he refers to this themed area as the New York backlot at 2:15. The facades are meant to represent nothing more then that, facades on a movie backlot.
 
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Nick

Staff member
Moderator
Sep 22, 2011
19,805
Orlando
You don't get the facade. Maybe Jason Surrell can explain it to you as he refers to this themed area as the New York backlot at 2:15. The facades are meant to represent nothing more then that, facades on a movie backlot.
That would be a great "story" excuse if they still regularly filmed on the backlot. They currently do not and have not since the dark period in the 2000's when they would rent out the NYC section fairly regularly for filming purposes.

Obviously the building looks far better than it did though.
 

tielo

Veteran Member
Nov 9, 2013
1,982
The Netherlands
That would be a great "story" excuse if they still regularly filmed on the backlot. They currently do not and have not since the dark period in the 2000's when they would rent out the NYC section fairly regularly for filming purposes.

Obviously the building looks far better than it did though.
The THEME is a BACKLOT... (Marilyn Monroe is filming there but it's not real).
It's like the THEME at Dinoland is "Cheap, tacky, ugly fair".
 

Mad Dog

Premium Member
Jan 30, 2013
18,132
Pittsburgh area
Finally got to give this a chance myself. Despite not revealing any story details, I'm just going to post my thoughts as a spoiler for those who want to go in with fresh eyes.

Let me just start out by saying that I am generally impressed by anything Disney or Universal puts out, so your mileage will likely vary. Therefore, I'm not one to participate in the SCREENZ debate and look at each ride's merits on its own. Having said that, I do understand the space limitations this building had. Since there isn't really much else Universal could do with such a small site, a simulator here seems like the only proper fit. You'd have a really cheesy and really short ride otherwise. With regards to the facade, it's a major improvement over Twister and looks cool at night, but I do mourn the fact that Universal continues to leave parts of the showbuilding exposed. Why they continue to settle for doubles instead of aiming for home-runs in this field I'll never understand.

I didn't know the wait time feature was active (it might have been the first day of operation) on the UO app, so I had to get a return time from the kiosk. I like that it gives you an option in choosing your time, but didn't like that the only times available were two half-hour slots within an hour time frame. I'm sure there will be more options once the system is fully active though. Once my time was reached, I headed right in.

The first lobby was perhaps my favorite. The displays for the original NBC equipment and each of the hosts were cool and informative. My favorite part was that the TVs showing footage for each host were reflective of the era (Fallon on a big plasma while Allen was on a box model with a screen the size of my fist). That's the kind of attention to detail that can sell a skeptical rider. I would have traded my time on the upper level to keep watching the old TV sets.

The second lobby was also done well, but since only one ride theatre was being used, also way too crowded. I suspect once they start using two, it will feel a little more relaxed up there, but we won't know until it officially opens. I can't give a review about the games on the desks, but they did look fun. Since there were many kids present, I figured they should have a chance to play and it did keep them from running around, which is a bonus. The Ragtime Gals were funny, but I am most definitely not a big music guy and didn't pay much attention to them. Hashtag looked like he was having fun, as were the people he was posing with.

As for the ride, I thought it was really fun. I strongly agree with others here that the ride cards need more definitive color shades since I thought my yellow card was orange and would have missed my entry if I didn't see other card colors. The ride itself was perhaps the smoothest one out of all Universal has to offer and does a great job synching with the video for a 72 seater. Speaking of the video, the 3D is most convincing I've ever seen used on a ride. If I didn't know any better (and since this is a theme park, I always allow a little suspension of disbelief), I could have sworn that Steve Higgins was standing there in person at the beginning. Once all was said and done, I was a little disturbed that the whole experience took about an hour without telling people at the entrance what the duration would be, but again that will likely change once softs are done. I also would have preferred the vehicles to be individual cars like the one Fallon uses, but c'est la vie.

Overall, is it a tad disheartening to see another simulator right down the road from Minion Mayhem? Absolutely. But I had a smile on my face from load to unload, and if that doesn't make this a good ride, I don't know what will.
This is probably the most thorough review I've read thus far. :thumbsup:Thanks for all the time & thought you put into in. Like you, the main thing I look for in an attraction is if it's fun and puts a smile on my face :). A year ago I was a skeptic about this attraction, but now I'm certainly looking forward to experiencing it when I visit in May.
 
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