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Universal's Epic Universe Construction Thread

gator

Rookie
Aug 17, 2009
127
I don’t know why but the way this is coming along reminds me of Duelling Dragons when your train would leave the station first and slowly crawl up the lift hill waiting on the train to catch up and then... away we go.
But then sometimes Fire would slowly crawl all the way to the top and Ice would never dispatch :/
 

Frank Drackman

Premium Member
Dec 20, 2012
2,411
Mouse Mountain
I don’t know why but the way this is coming along reminds me of Duelling Dragons when your train would leave the station first and slowly crawl up the lift hill waiting on the train to catch up and then... away we go.
but it is not just two trains this time. Virgin grabbed the naming from Brightline, when that stops at Disney Springs, MIA and ORL are as connected as Tampa is to Orlando today. So the build up of a high speed train, international tourism returning, stable currencies/consumer confidence in UNI's demo -- so many turning wheels that need to land in the same direction I imagine.


Well the parks hitting capacity (regardless of percentage) is hopefully one huge factor for them!
For UoR in 2020, does attendance mean a thing? Didn't they quickly sell a 'buy a day get the year' thing? I certainly heard on the news that they would hit capacity at 8:30, but how many hotels are open? Has any entertainment returned (has fallon been closed or do they just run w/o stuff like the rag time gals?).
 
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Scott W.

Premium Member
Feb 26, 2014
13,453
Glasgow
but it is not just two trains this time. Virgin grabbed the naming from Brightline, when that stops at Disney Springs, MIA and ORL are as connected as Tampa is to Orlando today. So the build up of a high speed train, international tourism returning, stable currencies/consumer confidence in UNI's demo -- so many turning wheels that need to land in the same direction I imagine.




For UoR in 2020, does attendance mean a thing? Didn't they quickly sell a 'buy a day get the year' thing? I certainly heard on the news that they would hit capacity at 8:30, but how many hotels are open? Has any entertainment returned (has fallon been closed or do they just run w/o stuff like the rag time gals?).
I don't see the train being a big deal. With the Disney Express you could always easily get from the airport to WDW and with plenty of people still staying on I Drive, it doesn't really help them at all. I'm still surprised that work hasn't fully started again on EU although they're plenty of other reasons. You need to gang back together at Universal Creative and the whole project relies on thousands of other vendors being ready to start providing the parts to get the ball rolling.

The word out about Dockside is that it's doing incredibly well this week. I don't see Florida going back on any Covid measures and I can only see attendance increasing from here on out, especially with the vaccine roll out. Look at Disney relaxing measures recently to see the direction they are heading.
 

Frank Drackman

Premium Member
Dec 20, 2012
2,411
Mouse Mountain
I don't see the train being a big deal. With the Disney Express you could always easily get from the airport to WDW and with plenty of people still staying on I Drive, it doesn't really help them at all. I'm still surprised that work hasn't fully started again on EU although they're plenty of other reasons. You need to gang back together at Universal Creative and the whole project relies on thousands of other vendors being ready to start providing the parts to get the ball rolling.

The word out about Dockside is that it's doing incredibly well this week. I don't see Florida going back on any Covid measures and I can only see attendance increasing from here on out, especially with the vaccine roll out. Look at Disney relaxing measures recently to see the direction they are heading.

My point about the train is that it makes Miami to Orlando as easy as Tampa to Orlando from a commuter aspect -- it makes folks flying into Miami a target for the parks just as much as it makes Miami Beach a target for folks flying into Orlando -- I believe it has the opportunity to redefine 'day guest' to the park. Anyway, I never road the train before we left SFL, but heard great things, they seemed to sell some comforts. Anyway, south east Florida has a huge population and a strong tourist base, the train brings that demo closer to Orlando just by adding high speed transportation between the two markets (they have three stations in south FL).
 

Mad Dog

Premium Member
Jan 30, 2013
19,617
Pittsburgh area
but it is not just two trains this time. Virgin grabbed the naming from Brightline, when that stops at Disney Springs, MIA and ORL are as connected as Tampa is to Orlando today. So the build up of a high speed train, international tourism returning, stable currencies/consumer confidence in UNI's demo -- so many turning wheels that need to land in the same direction I imagine.




For UoR in 2020, does attendance mean a thing? Didn't they quickly sell a 'buy a day get the year' thing? I certainly heard on the news that they would hit capacity at 8:30, but how many hotels are open? Has any entertainment returned (has fallon been closed or do they just run w/o stuff like the rag time gals?).
I believe the discount ticket ended before Christmas day, and they've still been slammed all week, having to open the second tower at Dockside to accommodate the tourists....Fallons been open all along as has all street entertainment acts, which USF has plenty of.
 

Mad Dog

Premium Member
Jan 30, 2013
19,617
Pittsburgh area
Universal is in the "best" position they could possibly be considering everything that has happened so far.
My opinion is that they are doing better than expectations, especially with all the negatives thrown at them. I give kudos to the Orlando Universal management for some
good decisions to keep the attendance acceptable, being flexible in their Florida resident ticket specials, and creating a level of enough interest and excitement to entice guests.
They've done a decent job with covid safety without making it difficult to schedule a visit through onerous reservation ticket and dining requirements.
 
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shiekra38

Legendary Member
Dec 13, 2009
12,359
Florida
Universal is in the "best" position they could possibly be considering everything that has happened so far.
They have the best momentum I'd say, but it was kinda scary when they first opened

Honestly I'd say them and the SeaWorld parks will come out better than expected from this

Both parks have experience tightening budgets and operating on slimmer margins in the past
 
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Cup_Of_Coffee

Veteran Member
Aug 7, 2018
4,508
Frankly I’d say they’re in a good position because it’s probably way easier than we think (obviously, to a degree) to cancel a 3rd theme park and stop all work, instead it’s just paused. Shows lots of optimism to me internally.
 

HandsomePete

Member
Jul 8, 2019
582
Frankly I’d say they’re in a good position because it’s probably way easier than we think (obviously, to a degree) to cancel a 3rd theme park and stop all work, instead it’s just paused. Shows lots of optimism to me internally.
They own the land so canceling it completely would actually be a colossal pain. They’d probably have to take a write off for all of the site prep that’s been done. It’s also the only place in the area where they could conceivably build a third gate, so selling the land would mean they’re out forever.

It’s wait-and-seeism to me - it’s not correct to say that the entire thing hinges on tax credits and international tourism, but there are a few big levers that nobody can actually forecast right now. Like UK tourism - you can’t say it’s going to bounce back by 2023, 2025, 2027 when you’re currently staring at zeros in a spreadsheet.
 
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shiekra38

Legendary Member
Dec 13, 2009
12,359
Florida
They own the land so canceling it completely would actually be a colossal pain. They’d probably have to take a write off for all of the site prep that’s been done. It’s also the only place in the area where they could conceivably build a third gate, so selling the land would mean they’re out forever.

It’s wait-and-seeism to me - it’s not correct to say that the entire thing hinges on tax credits and international tourism, but there are a few big levers that nobody can actually forecast right now. Like UK tourism - you can’t say it’s going to bounce back by 2023, 2025, 2027 when you’re currently staring at zeros in a spreadsheet.
I don't see them ever giving up that land again

I'm more confident about EU than I was in July lol
 
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fryoj

Premium Member
May 19, 2013
3,091
They own the land so canceling it completely would actually be a colossal pain. They’d probably have to take a write off for all of the site prep that’s been done. It’s also the only place in the area where they could conceivably build a third gate, so selling the land would mean they’re out forever.

It’s wait-and-seeism to me - it’s not correct to say that the entire thing hinges on tax credits and international tourism, but there are a few big levers that nobody can actually forecast right now. Like UK tourism - you can’t say it’s going to bounce back by 2023, 2025, 2027 when you’re currently staring at zeros in a spreadsheet.
Selling the land really isn't much of an option right now anyway. The amount of companies in a position to buy that property and have a reason to develop it could probably be counted on one hand, and all of those would probably have cheaper options. They'd have to piece it out to start selling it, and for that to be an option, things would have to get a lot worse or not recover any time soon. And even then, if things are that bad, we are back to who'd be developing land?
 
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HandsomePete

Member
Jul 8, 2019
582
Selling the land really isn't much of an option right now anyway. The amount of companies in a position to buy that property and have a reason to develop it could probably be counted on one hand, and all of those would probably have cheaper options. They'd have to piece it out to start selling it, and for that to be an option, things would have to get a lot worse or not recover any time soon. And even then, if things are that bad, we are back to who'd be developing land?
One of the major single-family housing developers would buy a decent chunk of it in a heartbeat.
 
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SeventyOne

V.I.P.
Jul 1, 2010
2,848
Orlando
Selling the land really isn't much of an option right now anyway. The amount of companies in a position to buy that property and have a reason to develop it could probably be counted on one hand, and all of those would probably have cheaper options. They'd have to piece it out to start selling it, and for that to be an option, things would have to get a lot worse or not recover any time soon. And even then, if things are that bad, we are back to who'd be developing land?
One of the major single-family housing developers would buy a decent chunk of it in a heartbeat.
I-4 is finally starting to take shape -- once those Lexus lanes are finished (mid-2020s?), all the sudden downtown is a guaranteed 15 minute commute from this site. McMansions and townhomes would sell easily. Never make the mistake of assuming Orlando is nothing but theme parks.
 

Legacy

Veteran Member
Jul 27, 2015
7,440
I-4 is finally starting to take shape -- once those Lexus lanes are finished (mid-2020s?), all the sudden downtown is a guaranteed 15 minute commute from this site. McMansions and townhomes would sell easily. Never make the mistake of assuming Orlando is nothing but theme parks.
It’s also strip malls and townhomes.
 

Alicia

Premium Member
Jul 17, 2014
10,357
Orlando
Do you know when this is meant to be complete?
According to this article, mid 2025 now: https://www.bizjournals.com/orlando/news/2020/10/19/kirkman-road-extension-orange-county-florida.html

The $305 million, 1.7-mile project — billed as a public/private partnership between Orange County and Universal — will begin work on all utilities by Dec. 1 this year and start roadwork by Dec. 1, 2021, Renzo Nastasi, transportation planning manager for Orange County, told Orlando Business Journal. Universal is expected to have completion/certification of roadway work by April 30, 2025.​